Healthy tip ‘Boiling over’ – by Jessica White Heart.Research@technology-trust-news.org

Posted by on Mar 23, 2014 in Uncategorized | No Comments
ARE YOU prone to blowing a fuse when your anger builds up? The stress and frustrations of work, overloaded schedules, traffic mayhem, queue jumping, irritating relatives and colleagues are just some of many triggers that could lead to our blood boiling. Depending on our personality type or the situation, we may struggle to keep the lid on our anger. Recent research published in the British Medical Journal has pointed to an increased risk of cardiovascular events (heart attack, stroke, arrhythmia) in the two hours following an angry outburst. While the study’s authors stress that anger may not directly cause a heart attack, it can make things worse for people who already have some of the risk factors for heart disease like smoking, obesity and high blood pressure, especially those prone to frequent angry outbursts. While anger is a normal human response, it can easily become a negative, easy reaction when under pressure. It’s worth identifying any angry behaviour patterns and stressors in your life and learning to manage them, for the sake of those around you and your heart. Don’t stew on it. Recognise when you’re angry and talk to someone about how you feel. Pour your thoughts into something creative like writing, drawing or painting. Learning to listen and avoid getting trapped in recurring, escalating conversations are also valuable skills worth practicing. Count to 10 if you’re feeling particularly ‘worked up’ and focus on your breathing, inhaling slowly through your nose. Picture yourself in a happy place or take yourself back to a memory where you were calm and collected or laughing your head off. Regular practice will see you entering your calm zone sooner when you next feel provoked. Positive channelling. Work out how to control your anger and turn those negative emotions into solving the problem in a constructive way and doing something that’s better for you, like some non-competitive exercise, housework, cleaning the car or yoga. Tackle those other risk factors like a high blood pressure, that “spare tyre”, those cigarettes, a lack of exercise or unhealthy cholesterol levels, to significantly lower your background risk of heart disease and take the strain off your heart. Extra help. Sometimes our behaviour patterns need a bit of expert help to stop that pressure-cooker exploding. Visit the NHS Choices website www.nhs.uk for more advice and practical help. Angry thoughts and emotions can easily brew up when we’re tired and under-pressure, but just like unhealthy habits such as smoking or eating a poor diet, it’s up to us to take control and find ways to stop the sparks flying. Add a ‘chill-pill’ on top of a truly heart-healthy lifestyle to keep your heart in tip top condition. Comments, please to: editor. Click here to visit the CCC Life magazine archive. Please go here and sign our direct.gov.uk Stop Homelessness e-petition. http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/46727. Then please pass this link to all your friends. If enough people sign then the law will change and homelessness will be a thing of the past. Thank you.

Healthy tip ‘Boiling over’ – by Jessica White Heart.Research@technology-trust-news.org

Posted by on Mar 23, 2014 in march2014 | No Comments
ARE YOU prone to blowing a fuse when your anger builds up? The stress and frustrations of work, overloaded schedules, traffic mayhem, queue jumping, irritating relatives and colleagues are just some of many triggers that could lead to our blood boiling. Depending on our personality type or the situation, we may struggle to keep the lid on our anger. Recent research published in the British Medical Journal has pointed to an increased risk of cardiovascular events (heart attack, stroke, arrhythmia) in the two hours following an angry outburst. While the study’s authors stress that anger may not directly cause a heart attack, it can make things worse for people who already have some of the risk factors for heart disease like smoking, obesity and high blood pressure, especially those prone to frequent angry outbursts. While anger is a normal human response, it can easily become a negative, easy reaction when under pressure. It’s worth identifying any angry behaviour patterns and stressors in your life and learning to manage them, for the sake of those around you and your heart. Don’t stew on it. Recognise when you’re angry and talk to someone about how you feel. Pour your thoughts into something creative like writing, drawing or painting. Learning to listen and avoid getting trapped in recurring, escalating conversations are also valuable skills worth practicing. Count to 10 if you’re feeling particularly ‘worked up’ and focus on your breathing, inhaling slowly through your nose. Picture yourself in a happy place or take yourself back to a memory where you were calm and collected or laughing your head off. Regular practice will see you entering your calm zone sooner when you next feel provoked. Positive channelling. Work out how to control your anger and turn those negative emotions into solving the problem in a constructive way and doing something that’s better for you, like some non-competitive exercise, housework, cleaning the car or yoga. Tackle those other risk factors like a high blood pressure, that “spare tyre”, those cigarettes, a lack of exercise or unhealthy cholesterol levels, to significantly lower your background risk of heart disease and take the strain off your heart. Extra help. Sometimes our behaviour patterns need a bit of expert help to stop that pressure-cooker exploding. Visit the NHS Choices website www.nhs.uk for more advice and practical help. Angry thoughts and emotions can easily brew up when we’re tired and under-pressure, but just like unhealthy habits such as smoking or eating a poor diet, it’s up to us to take control and find ways to stop the sparks flying. Add a ‘chill-pill’ on top of a truly heart-healthy lifestyle to keep your heart in tip top condition. Comments, please to: editor. Click here to visit the CCC Life magazine archive. Please go here and sign our direct.gov.uk Stop Homelessness e-petition. http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/46727. Then please pass this link to all your friends. If enough people sign then the law will change and homelessness will be a thing of the past. Thank you.
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever does." Margaret Mead - Anthropologist, (1901 - 1978)

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